Revolution revenue

Revolutionaries?

I read too much. Yesterday I read where the church as we know it is over. Everybody will eventually bail out of the buildings and all the staff of churches will be working at Wal-Mart. People will be meeting in their homes and in Starbucks, and to hell with organized, bureaucratic heavy Model-A type churches that now house millions. Soon they will be gone, according to some. Check this quote out:

“God is changing the church, and that, in turn, will change the world. Millions of Christians around the world are aware of an imminent reformation of global proportions. They are saying in effect: ‘Church as we know it is preventing church as God wants it.’ Amazingly, many are hearing God say the same thing to them.”

A friend of mine actually had one of these guys tell him, as he is about to start his new church, “You need to go sell shoes instead of taking a salary from the church.” What I find strangely amusing is all the guys telling us to dismantle our churches are making a freaking load of money off of telling everyone else to quit their ministry.

This seems so egocentric to me. Maybe I’m feeling threatened, though I too don’t like a lot of what I’ve experienced and still see in the standard organized church. But the “brains” behind these books, conferences, web blogs, and all sit back, criticize what is, rake in the dough, and walk off. I’d like to see these folks put all their money from their books and all, in a trust account for all the pastors they want to see unemployed. Maybe then I would believe their intentions were good.

I’ve got news for the revolutionaries, God cannot be hindered in what he wants from the church. It’s his, and he builds it, not Wolfie, the Barnster, nor me, nor any other pastor. To assume that “amazingly” a few people have dialed in to God’s voice also sounds strange and elitist. Church has been left unscripted in the scriptures for a reason. Why do we have to condemn a process we don’t like and relegate it to not being of God?

Was it Moody that said to a critic one day, “I like what we’re doing better than what you’re not doing”? There’s a lot of pompous positioning going on out there in postmodern-land. I know we are in for changes within our culture, and I’m trying hard to listen, learn, and evolve as is needed to see that we have a community presence that speaks of Christ’s love for the world, and see that we also grow in our relationship to one another and Christ.

Critics abound today, and some of them are making a good living at it.

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2 Responses to Revolution revenue

  1. sheepnflock says:

    The temple priests and Levites had very specific tasks… somebody has to man the temple and the flock. Pastors (shepherds) can’t be out there selling shoes at Wal-Mart AND leading us in the Call. Somebody does need to be out there selling shoes: the church. We, the flock, reach other sheep, bump into them, eat and sleep with them, live with them. But without our shepherd, we are nothing but a bunch of dumb, lost sheep with no direction; just hangin’ out.

  2. reachmyrtle says:

    Using Old Testament structure as an example may be a poor one. Paul was a tent maker and I believe funded his ministry from this as well as the other disciples uses their businesses to fund ministry operations. The disciples were probably small business owners. It takes an entrupenarial spirit to change the world. The important thing is the realness of the pastor. A pastor that has friends outside of the church (unsaved) is a pastor to be admired. Pastors so many times have their own kingdoms without touching the outside world. I think every pastor needs a role in the community that is secular. That role may be surfing contests or working in Walmart or coaching kids sports.

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